patient information & advice

Therapeutic pain management

Acupuncture is form of treatment offered by trained Physiotherapists. There is good evidence to show that it is effective, and it is often used alongside other treatments like exercise and mobilisation of your joints and muscles. Our Physiotherapists will discuss with you whether acupuncture can benefit you, the number of sessions required and check for any contra-indications. Our Physiotherapists are registered under the Acupuncture Association of Chartered Physiotherapists (AACP).

        • Exercise and stretches
        • Mobilisation
        • Taping
        • TENS and other electrotherapy modalities
        • Acupuncture
        • Advice on medication management (as most of our therapists are Independent prescribers).

    Stroke Rehab and Parkinson’s

    What Is A Stroke?
    A stroke or cerebrovascular accident (CVA) results from an interruption of the blood supply to part of the brain. This can be caused by a blocked or burst blood vessel. Without a rich blood supply and oxygen, the brain cells can become irreversibly damaged. Although brain cells are unable to recover from the damage caused by a stroke, areas of the brain are able to adapt to learn new tasks and compensate for the area that has been damaged.

    There are two main types of stroke, ischemic and haemorrhagic:

    Ischemic:
    About 80% of strokes are ischemic and result from a clot or blockage forming in the blood vessel, causing a lack of oxygen to the brain cells. The clot can occur at the site of the blockage, or it can travel from other blood vessels in the body and become lodged in the arteries that supply the brain.

    Haemorrhagic:
    These result from blood vessels in and around the brain rupturing and causing bleeding in the surrounding areas. This causes a build up of pressure which damages the delicate tissues. The disruption of the blood supply also results in the cells in the surrounding areas being starved of oxygen.

    Transient Ischemic Attacks (TIA) are often known as mini strokes. These are brief episodes where some brain function is temporarily lost due to short disruption of the blood supply. Symptoms, such as limb weakness, last less than 24 hours as the cells in the brain have not been permanently damaged.

    You can find more information about risk factors and life after stroke in www. Stroke.org.uk. How to identify stroke – https://www.nhs.uk/actfast/pages/stroke.aspx

    Effects:
    The effects of stroke are determined by the type of stroke, area of the brain affected and the extent of the damage to the brain tissue. The brain is an incredibly complex organ, with each area having the responsibility for a specific function or ability.

    Some of the common effects of stroke are:

    • Muscle weakness (usually on one side)
    • Increased tone or spasticity
    • Reduced sensation
    • Reduced balance and coordination
    • Reduced mobility
    • Difficulty with swallowing
    • Speech and language difficulties
    • Difficulties with spatial and perceptual abilities
    • Changes in behaviour, such as becoming more impulsive
    • Memory difficulties
    • Incontinence
    • Fatigue
    • Mood changes

    Stroke Rehab at home:
    Many stroke survivors experience the most dramatic recovery during their stay in hospital in the weeks after their stroke.

    But many stroke survivors continue to improve over a longer time, sometimes over a number of years. Their recovery is in fact a long period of rehabilitation, as they learn to deal with the effects the stroke has had on them.

    Rehabilitation is about getting back to normal life and living as independent a life as possible. It involves taking an active approach to ensuring that life goes on for people who have had a stroke. This can mean helping them to acquire new skills or relearn old ones. It may involve helping them adapt to the limitations caused by stroke.

    Physiotherapy for stroke:
    Through a variety of treatment techniques, our specialised physiotherapists aim to:

    • Increase muscle strength through strengthening and mobilisation exercises
    • Improve balance and mobility through assessment of different mobility aids and postural re-education
    • Reduce muscle stiffness, spasms and pain through stretching programmes
    • Reduce the risk of falls through balance work, gait re-education and training
    • Increase functional activity of the affected arm and leg through home exercise programmes
    • Help reduce foot drop through functional electrical stimulation (FES) and various orthotics
    • Increase function, independence and quality of life

    Occupational Therapy for stroke:
    Our specialist OT’s aim to improve areas of personal care, work or leisure that are becoming difficult. This can be achieved through:

    • Assessing function in your own environment and establish any needs for equipment, adaptations, or further rehabilitation.
    • Hand therapy including splinting and exercise programmes.
    • Assessment and Treatment of cognitive deficits.
    • Aiding perception and problems solving difficulties.

    Speech and Language Therapy for stroke:
    Communication and swallowing are a key part of life and if you’re experiencing difficulty it may be having a huge impact on your quality of life. Our specialist speech and language therapist may be able to help you through:

    • Guidance on feeding and swallowing to avoid choking.
    • Training for family and carers on how to communicate with someone with dysphasia.
    • Strengthening muscles of the face and mouth to improve speech.
    • Advice on communication aids.

    Please refer NICE guideline for information on long term rehabilitation after stroke.

    What Is Parkinson’s?
    Parkinson’s is a progressive neurological condition, resulting from the degeneration of dopamine producing neurones in the basal ganglia, deep in the lower region of the brain. The role of the basal ganglia is to orchestrate the performance of well-learnt, voluntary and semi-automatic motor skills and movement sequences. Dopamine also contributes to other processes, such as maintaining and switching focus of attention, problem solving and decision making.

    Symptoms
    The onset of symptoms is slow and may go unnoticed for several years. Symptoms usually affect one side of the body early on and a tremor is often present, but not in all cases.

    The causes of Parkinson’s have not yet been determined, but it is believed that it is likely to be caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors.

    A wide variety of symptoms can present as the condition progresses, and each individual is different and therefore will experience different symptoms, and at different times.

    Some of the main symptoms can be divided into motor and non-motor symptoms. Motor symptoms are those affecting movements, and non-motor symptoms are any other symptoms that do not directly affect movement and motor function.

    The main symptoms of Parkinson’s are:

    Motor Symptoms:

    Bradykinesia:
    slow movements and difficulty initiating movements.

    Rigidity:
    Increased muscle tone, stiffness and muscle cramps.

    Tremor:
    Involuntary shaking, trembling or quivering movements of the muscles.

    Postural Instability:
    Difficulty with balance and walking.

    Freezing:
    Initiation of movements i.e. starting walking or standing up can become difficult. Crossing thresholds such as doorways or walking in enclosed spaces can also become more challenging.

      Non-motor Symptoms:

      Anxiety

      Mood changes

      Sleep disturbances and fatigue

      Memory difficulties

      Weight loss

      Speech and swallowing difficulties

      Pain

          Treatments for Parkinson’s
          At Hobbs rehabilitation, we offer a variety of services for treatment and rehabilitation of both the motor and non-motor symptoms of Parkinson’s. Clinical guidelines suggest a multi-disciplinary approach is key in the management of Parkinson’s, therefore we work very closely with other health care professionals.

          Physiotherapy For Parkinson’s:
          As each individual responds differently to the condition, our specialised physiotherapists aim to individualise treatment. Some of the physiotherapy treatments we offer can help to:

          Reduce rigidity and improve posture through stretching and postural re-education

          Increase speed and amplitude of movements through muscle strengthening and mobilisation exercises.

          Cueing Strategies

          Increase mobility through assessment of different mobility aids

          Reduce muscle stiffness, spasms and pain through stretching programmes

          Reduce postural instability and balance problems through core stability exercises and balance training

          Reduce the risk of falls through balance work, gait re-education and strengthening

          Increase functional independence and quality of life

          Fatigue management and advice

          Occupational Therapy for Parkinson’s:
          Our specialist OT’s aim to improve areas of personal care, work or leisure that are becoming difficult. This can be achieved through:

          Cognitive measures to assist with memory difficulties

          Assessing function in your own environment and establish any needs for equipment, adaptations, or further rehabilitation.

          Hand therapy including splinting and exercise programmes

          Assessment and treatment of cognitive deficits

          Strategies to improve problem-solving abilities and memory.

          Handwriting techniques and adaptive equipment.


          Speech & Language Therapy for Parkinson’s: 

          About 70-80% of people with Parkinson’s experience difficulty with excess saliva and swallowing. Many people with Parkinson’s find difficulty with the volume, tone and pitch of their voice and often speech becomes much quieter as a result. Our specialist speech and language therapist may be able to help you through:

          Training for family and carers on how to communicate with someone with dysphasia.

          Lee Silverman Voice Treatment

          Advice on communication aids.

          Click here for Information Sheets on Cueing for People with Parkinson’s Disease- https://hces-online.net/websites/rescue/pubs/info_sheets.htm

          falls prevention

          Our Therapists are trained in specialist falls prevention and management course, qualified as Postural Stability Instructors (www.laterlifetraining.co.uk) – qualified to organise individual and group programmes for falls prevention, based on FaME and Otago exercises.

          Recent statics from Age UK (www.ageuk.org.uk) has shown that falls and fractures in people over 65 make up for over 4 million hospital bed days in England alone and the healthcare cost for fractures associated is approximately £2 billion per year.

          After a fall an older person has a 50% probability of having significantly reduced mobility and makes them feel more vulnerable and less independent. 1 in 10 people who fall become afraid to leave their homes in case they fall again.

            A falls prevention programme tailored to the individual person can reduce falls by approximately 54%. The programme helps to address any hazards in the home, related medical problems and increase strength, mobility, flexibility, coordination and balance. Evidence states that a minimum of 50 hours of exercise over a period of time such as 6 months should be advised.

            The falls prevention programme includes:

            • Exercise programme (Otago, FaME based)
            • Environment assessment and modification
            • Equipment (aids and alarms – Telecare)
            • Mobility and transfer practise
            • Patient and carer education

            home visits

            We provide service around London, Essex, Kent, and Waltham forest. Please contact us to find out about our therapists covering your area.

            fees

            The fees would depend on the complexity/needs, time required for assessment and treatment, specialities required etc. Please contact us for further information on fees, profile of therapist available to visit you.

            registered office

            Aspire Rehab Limited
            118 Danes way,
            Brentwood,
            Essex,
            United Kingdom,
            CM159JU

            FREE CONSULTATIONS

            We offer a free of charge, no obligation consultation over the telephone to support you in making decision about your rehabilitation needs.

             

            If you require any information or treatment outside of our expertise, we will be happy to signpost you to other relevant agencies..

            HOW TO BOOK:
            We accept self referrals, referrals from family/carers, health and social care professionals, case managers/solicitors and nursing homes. To discuss the referral or book an appointment, please email contact@aspirerehab.co.uk or call 07723332426 / 02039835146.

            Longfield Integrated Care Centre
            Tuppence House,
            Brickfield Farm,
            Main Road,
            Longfield, Kent,
            DA3 7PJ

            Get Directions

            Aspire Rehab
            118 Danes Way,
            Brentwood,
            CM15 9JU

            Get Directions

            Areas We Cover

            Home visits: We cover Essex, Havering, Barking and Dagenham, Redbridge, Waltham Forest

            Clinic Base: Longfield Integrated care centre, (Longfield Poly Clinic) Longfield, Kent, DA3 7PJ.

            Contact us for a free phone consultation!

            Contact Us

            get in touch if you require a free phone consultation.

            for clinic appointments

            Longfield Integrated Care Centre
            (Longfield Polyclinic)
            Tuppence House, Brickfield Farm,
            Main Road, Longfield, Kent, DA3 7PJ

             

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            I was waiting for Physiotherapy from NHS after the back surgery, but you saw me immediately and filled the gap. The timely advice you gave on using electrical simulation for foot, back care and exercises helped me to walk again with reduced foot drop and back pain. When the NHS Physiotherapist started therapy, he was happy to see me already improving and doing right things after the surgery. Now I am back to driving my taxi

            ,,

            Thanks for seeing my mother the same day of the referral, she is happy to start walking again

            ,,

            Thanks for helping to manage my pain and inactivity- I was not walking or exercising due to my pain from fIbromyalgia. With your help I manage my pain better using TENS and exercises, and I feel positive

            ,,

            Thank you for providing a responsive and quality service

            ,,

            You are a good teacher, I learnt a lot on how to manage my husband's symptoms

            ,,

            Thanks for your support. You are great in your approach. You will be the Physio for my whole family, whenever we needed
            Get In Touch